What is my screen resolution? 7 ways to find out

Regardless of whether you have a PC, a laptop, or any other device that runs on Windows, it probably has a screen attached to it. It can be a monitor, a laptop or tablet display, or even a TV screen. Have you wondered what your screen's resolution is? Do you want to learn how to find what resolution your display uses? If you did, read this article and see seven ways to answer this question:

1. Find your screen resolution by checking the Display section from the Settings app (Windows 10 only)

If you are using Windows 10 one of the easiest methods to find out the resolution of your screen is to check the Display section from the Settings app. Open Settings with a click or a tap on its button from the Start Menu.

The Settings button from the Windows 10 Start Menu

In the Settings app, click or tap System.

The System category of settings from the Windows 10 Settings app

Select Display on the left sidebar and scroll on the right side of the window until you find the area called Scale and layout. This is the place where you can see a setting called Resolution. Its current value is the current resolution that your screen uses. For example, in the screenshot below, you can see that our laptop has a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels.

The Display page from the Windows 10 Settings app

NOTE: The native resolution of your display is marked to its right by a label that says Recommended.

You should also know that there is also a slightly faster way to get to the Display page from the Settings app. Right-click or tap and hold on an empty space from your desktop, and click or tap the Display settings option from the contextual menu.

The right-click menu on the desktop of Windows 10

2. Find your screen resolution by checking the Screen Resolution from the Control Panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8.1)

In Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, a good way to find out the resolution used by your screen is to open the Screen Resolution section from the Control Panel. Start by opening the Control Panel - click or tap on its shortcut from the Start Menu (in Windows 7) or the Start Screen (in Windows 8.1).

The Control Panel button from the Start Menu in Windows 7

In the Control Panel, navigate to Hardware and Sound and click the "Adjust screen resolution" link from the Display category of settings.

The Adjust screen resolution link from the Control Panel

On the Screen Resolution page, there is a setting called Resolution. Its selected value is the resolution currently used by your display.

For example, in the screenshot below, our display uses a resolution of 1280 x 768 pixels.

The Screen Resolution settings from the Control Panel

Note that there is also a faster way to get to this section from the Control Panel: right-click or tap and hold on an empty space from your desktop, and click or tap the Screen resolution option from the contextual menu.

The right-click menu on the desktop of Windows 7

3. Find your screen resolution by checking the Display page from the PC Settings app (Windows 8.1 only)

In Windows 8.1, you can see the resolution used by your screen by checking the Display page from the PC Settings app. Open PC Settings, and go to PC and devices and then to Display. Now look at the right side of the screen, and you see a setting called Resolution and a value displayed on its right side. This is the resolution used by your screen. For example, in the screenshot below, you can see that our screen has a resolution of 1440 x 900 pixels.

The Customize your display area from the Windows 8.1 PC Settings

4. Find your screen resolution by running the DirectX Diagnostic Tool (all Windows versions)

Regardless of what Windows version you have, you can always use the DirectX Diagnostic Tool to find what resolution your screen has. Open the Run window, the Command Prompt or PowerShell. In any of these apps, type the command dxdiag and press Enter on your keyboard.

The dxdiag command entered in Command Prompt

In the DirectX Diagnostic Tool, go to the Display tab and scroll down the Device list and look for a field called "Current Display Mode." The value to its right tells you the current resolution of your screen. For example, in the next screenshot, you can see that our monitor has a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels.

The Current Display Mode in the DirectX Diagnostic Tool

5. Find your screen resolution using the System Information app (all Windows versions)

You can also see the resolution of your screen in the System Information app. Open it by following one of the methods described here: 10 ways to start System Information in Windows (all versions).

Then, expand the Components list from the left side of the window, and click or tap Display. On the right side of the window, scroll until you find the item called Resolution. Its value tells you the resolution of the screen. For example, in the image below, you can see that our display resolution is 1920 x 1080 pixels.

The Resolution field from the System Information app

6. Find your screen resolution by running a command in Command Prompt or PowerShell (all Windows versions)

If you like using the Command Prompt or PowerShell, you can use the command wmic path Win32_VideoController get CurrentHorizontalResolution,CurrentVerticalResolution to find out what resolution your screen has.

Running a command that shows the screen resolution, in PowerShell

7. Find your screen resolution by visiting a website (all Windows versions)

This might be the easiest method to find out the resolution of your screen, but it might also be unreliable on some hardware configurations. To put it briefly, all you have to do is use your favorite web browser and visit a website that can automatically identify your screen resolution. A good example of such a website is this: whatsmyscreenresolution.com. When you visit it, the first thing you see is the resolution it detects for your screen.

A website that automatically detects the screen resolution

How do you prefer to find what resolution your screen has?

These are the methods we can think of for finding out the resolution of the screen in Windows, without using third-party tools. Do you know other ways to find this information? Which method do you like best? Do not forget that you can always share your opinion and questions, in the comments section below.