Export passwords from your web browser: Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Edge, and Internet Explorer

Web browsers, including popular ones such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, Microsoft Edge, and even Internet Explorer, can store your passwords. It is a useful feature to have in your web browser, as it makes it easier for you to sign into your online accounts. However, if you are considering changing your primary web browser, or switching to a password manager, you might want to move all your passwords from the old web browser to the new one. A tedious way is to do it site by site, password by password. A much faster way is to export all your stored passwords at once from your browser and then import them where you need them. To help you start, we show you how to export all your passwords from Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, Microsoft Edge, and Internet Explorer.

NOTE: For creating this tutorial, we used the latest versions of the web browsers mentioned, available at the time of writing: Google Chrome 68, Mozilla Firefox 61, Opera 54, Microsoft Edge 42 and Internet Explorer 11.

How to export passwords from Google Chrome

Start by opening Google Chrome. In its address bar type this text: chrome://flags. Then, press Enter.

In the chrome://flags tab, type "Password export" in the Search flags field from the top of the page.

The search should yield only one result: Password export. On its right side, click or tap the Default drop-down list and choose Enabled.

Google Chrome now asks you to reopen it. Click or tap Relaunch now.

After Google Chrome restarts, use its address bar to go to chrome://settings/passwords.

Scroll down until you get to the section called Saved Passwords. On its right side, click or tap on the menu button, which looks like three dots stacked vertically.

The menu has only one option, called Export passwords. Click or tap on it.

Then, Google Chrome tells you that "Your passwords will be visible to anyone who can see the exported file." That happens because all the passwords stored in your browser are saved in a CSV file that is not encrypted, and anyone can read it using any simple text editor. Click or tap on Export passwords.

Windows detects that you want to export your browser passwords and asks you to confirm your identity. That means that you have to enter the username and password for your Windows user account. Do that, and then press OK.

If you entered your details correctly, now Google Chrome asks you where you want to save your passwords. Choose the location you prefer and click or tap Save.

That is it! Now all your passwords are available to see and use in the CSV file that you specified.

How to export passwords from Mozilla Firefox

Mozilla Firefox does not offer a built-in option to export your passwords. The only way you can quickly do it is to use a third-party tool. There are not many to be found on the internet, but the best we managed to discover is called FF Password Exporter. It is an open-source tool that was developed by Kyle Spearrin. You can find the tool on GitHub, at this address: FF Password Exporter. At the bottom of the page, click or tap on the download link that matches your operating system and your preference for the portable or installable version of the tool.

We chose to use the portable version. Once you download it, double-click or double-tap on the FF-Password-Exporter-Portable-1.0.1 executable file.

The FF Password Exporter application is all about a small window with a few options. It should automatically detect your user profile from Firefox's installation folder.

If it does not, you can use the "choose a custom profile directory" to get to it.

If you have set a master password in your Firefox, enter it in the Firefox Master Password. Otherwise, let this field blank.

Then choose the type of the file in which you want your passwords to be saved. By default, it is set to CSV, but you can also choose to use JSON. If you intend to import your passwords in another web browser, such as Google Chrome, you should use the CSV file type.

Click or tap on Export Passwords, select the location and the name of the file that is going to be created, and click or tap Save.

That is it! Now all your passwords are available to see and use in the file that you created.

How to export passwords from Opera

Start by opening Opera. In its address bar type this text: opera://flags. Then, press Enter.

In the Experiments tab, type Password export in the Search flags field.

The search should give you only one result: Password export. On its right side, click or tap Default and choose Enabled in the list that shows up.

Opera now asks you to reopen it. Click or tap Relaunch now.

After Opera restarts, use its address bar to go to opera://settings/passwords.

Under the list of Saved Passwords, click or tap the Export button.

Windows detects that you want to export your browser passwords and asks you to confirm your identity. That means that you have to enter the username and password for your Windows user account. Do that, and then press OK.

If you entered your details correctly, now Opera asks you where you want to save your passwords. Choose the location you prefer and click or tap Save. A funny side note here: the default name used by Opera for the passwords file is Chrome Passwords. :)

That is it! Now all your passwords are available to see and use in the CSV file that you specified.

How to export passwords from Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer

We would have loved to say that you can do this with ease. Unfortunately, you cannot export saved passwords from Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer using safe methods. Microsoft chooses to store all the passwords you saved using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer, in the Web Credentials section from Windows' Credential Manager. You can read more about what this tool are and what it does in Windows, in these articles:

There are a few tools on the web that can access the passwords you saved in Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer, and decrypt them, but they are too shady for us to recommend them to our readers safely. If you know of any safe method that works for these two web browsers, we would be thrilled to hear from you, in a comment below.

Why did you want to export the passwords you saved in your web browser?

Everybody has his or her reason for doing it. However, we are curious to hear which was yours? Did you want to export your saved passwords from your browser because you wanted to move them to a new computer and import them into a new web browser? Maybe you wanted to move your passwords to a password management service? Are there any other reasons? Share your thoughts, questions or advice in the comments section below.